rearing pond

Back pond reinforced at Hoy Creek Hatchery

Pond-bagging-Rodney-Lee-HSWS.jpg

Over a few weeks in May 2018, the back rearing pond  (west of the screened rearing pond) was partially drained and inspected. This has not been done in many years. 

A new liner was added to the pond, and the banks were reinforced with new sandbags. Work sessions took place on Saturday mornings and during the week.

It was discovered that a small channel had formed around the pond's outflow area and salmon were getting confused by it since it didn't lead to the creek. It's all good now - we fixed it! 

What the pond area looks like with most of the water drained. 

What the pond area looks like with most of the water drained. 

Leo and Steven working hard to fill sand bags to secure the pond area. 

Leo and Steven working hard to fill sand bags to secure the pond area. 

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society (HSWS) is a volunteer-run non-profit society that operates a small salmon hatchery beside Hoy Creek and conducts a salmon enhancement program in partnership with the City of Coquitlam, and with technical expertise from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The group stewards the Hoy and Scott Watersheds, promoting public awareness and education, and is involved in watershed habitat restoration and preservation. 

New Art Fixture Installed at Hoy Creek Hatchery

A new dragonfly metal art-piece is proudly displayed above the rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery contributed by local artist, Patricia Gaspar.  All three of the pieces here were created over the years by the same artist.

A new dragonfly metal art-piece is proudly displayed above the rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery contributed by local artist, Patricia Gaspar.  All three of the pieces here were created over the years by the same artist.

The local salmon hatchery in Coquitlam, nestled in Hoy Creek Linear Park and operated by the Hoy-Scott Watershed Society (HSWS) has just welcomed a new art piece by local artist, Patricia Gaspar.

The metal dragonfly was installed in time for Salmon Leave Home on May 7th.

The sparkling and bejeweled dragonfly is mounted above the rearing pond which houses coho from May to May of each year before they are released into Hoy Creek at Salmon Leave Home.

"We are so pleased to have yet another charming piece of artwork from Patricia on the hatchery grounds," said HSWS president Robbin Whachell.  "Patricia's artwork can be enjoyed by the entire community, and is in sync with our objective of bringing public awareness and education toward the restoration and preservation of our local habitat."

View other artwork at Hoy Creek Hatchery by Patricia Gaspar HERE.

The Hoy-Scott Watershed Society executive would highly recommend Patricia Gaspar for any art projects, in particular those that benefit the community.  Visit the artist's website HERE.

The rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery in Coquitlam. Home to our coho salmon from May through May.  When grown to smolts, the salmon are released into the creek at Salmon Leave Home.

The rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery in Coquitlam. Home to our coho salmon from May through May.  When grown to smolts, the salmon are released into the creek at Salmon Leave Home.

The new dragonfly art piece by Patricia Gaspar, mounted above the rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery.

The new dragonfly art piece by Patricia Gaspar, mounted above the rearing pond at Hoy Creek Hatchery.

Brood transfer and summer cleanup at Hoy Creek Hatchery

Volunteers clean and disinfect equipment in the Capilano trough room at the Hoy Creek Hatchery

Volunteers clean and disinfect equipment in the Capilano trough room at the Hoy Creek Hatchery

On Saturday, June 25th volunteers with the Hoy-Scott Watershed Society, under the guidance of hatchery manager, Rodney Lee, moved the coho salmon brood from the Capilano trough room over to the outdoor rearing pond adjacent to Hoy Creek.

After the transfer of over 6000 fry, members cleaned all equipment in the trough room, which will not be used again until brood intake in the fall. The Capilano trough will remain empty until early next year.

Both incubation areas were also cleaned and disinfected so they are ready for brood intake this fall / winter. 2016 will mark the first year of the intake of chum salmon, along with coho.

We invite the community to come by and take a peek through the fencing on our rearing pond to see the salmon, which are usually visible on clear weather days.  The fish are fed daily before 10am. Feel free to stop by and ask questions of our volunteers.

See our Photo Album from this exercise on Facebook HERE.

Volunteers Earl, Maurice, and Ed clean the automated feeders

Volunteers Earl, Maurice, and Ed clean the automated feeders

The fish are now living in the rearing pond adjacent to Hoy Creek. They are seen below in this video.  See more photos of our rearing pond HERE.

Volunteers clean charcoal by hand in a wheel barrow. The charcoal is used for the filtration system for the Capilano trough.

Volunteers clean charcoal by hand in a wheel barrow. The charcoal is used for the filtration system for the Capilano trough.