Wildlife and Insects

Aside from fish, a healthy watershed has other wildlife inhabiting it.  The watershed provides important habitat for wildlife including raccoon, black bear, beaver, Douglas squirrel, black-tailed deer, otter, mink, shrew, and coyote. You may also see frogs, turtles, slugs, and snakes.

The video of the raccoon below was taken in April 2016 from the bridge adjacent to Hoy Creek Hatchery. The raccoon was not bothered that there were several humans watching him only a few yards away.

 Our neighborly racoon by Hoy Creek Hatchery, April 2016 (Photo Rodney Lee / HSWS) 

Our neighborly racoon by Hoy Creek Hatchery, April 2016 (Photo Rodney Lee / HSWS) 

  A black  squirrel  eating seeds out front of the hatchery. (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

A black squirrel eating seeds out front of the hatchery. (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

HSWS-Bird-Ed-Paulino

BIRD LIFE

There are a variety of birds that make the watershed their home, like the band-tailed pigeon which roosts in trees along lower Scott Creek. The great blue heron is often seen fishing in the creeks. You might also glimpse or hear the wild laugh of the red-headed pileated woodpecker.  Other birds in the watershed include owls, chickadees, belted kingfishers, spotted towhees, wood ducks, mallard ducks, varied thrush and winter wrens.

 A blue heron at Hoy Creek, Coquitlam. (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

A blue heron at Hoy Creek, Coquitlam. (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

The Blue Heron

The great blue heron is a frequent visitor to the our watershed. Residents in the area often see a blue heron wading in the shallow waters of Hoy Creek patiently fishing for his next meal.

 Blue heron at Hoy Creek (Photo: Robbin Whachell /HSWS)

Blue heron at Hoy Creek (Photo: Robbin Whachell /HSWS)

  Two barred owls along Hoy Trail in Coquitlam, BC, Canada (Photo: Ed Paulino /HSWS - 2016)

Two barred owls along Hoy Trail in Coquitlam, BC, Canada (Photo: Ed Paulino /HSWS - 2016)

INSECTS    Butteries, bees, flies and more...

A healthy watershed is alive with insect life. Butterflies, bees, flies, spiders, ladybugs, mosquitoes and more. Insects not only serve as food for larger insects, but also for most watershed wildlife, including fish.  They also assist nature in the decomposing process.

A ladybug by Hoy Creek.   (Photo: Ed Paulino)

Slugs help with the decomposition of plant life.  Banana slug photo by Robbin Whachell / HSWS.

This little creature was spotted by Hoy Creek in March 2016. We think it's a cockroach stonefly nymph. It looks like it's emerging. They crawl out of the water and emerge as an adult. We believe the orange part shows where the exoskeleton was splitting on it's back to shed so it can emerge. It was approx. 4cm in length. (Photo: Rodney Lee / HSWS)

A butterfly by Hoy Creek (Photo: Robbin Whachell / HSWS)