hatchery

Fishy Fun at 2017 Salmon Leave Home

A mother and son peek at a coho fingerling held by a HSWS volunteer at Salmon Leave Home (Photo: Robbin Whachell / HSWS)

A mother and son peek at a coho fingerling held by a HSWS volunteer at Salmon Leave Home (Photo: Robbin Whachell / HSWS)

And they're gone!

Coho smolts that had their start in life at the Hoy Creek Hatchery in Coquitlam are well on their way to adapting to life in the stream.  Approximately 5000 smolts were released at Hoy-Scott Watershed Society's Salmon Leave Home event on May 7th.

When ready, they will make their way from Hoy Creek to Scott Creek, then Coquitlam River, then to the Fraser River, and then on to the Straight of Georgia and the Pacific Ocean.

A father and son set to release coho smolts into Hoy Creek during Salmon Leave Home on May 7th, 2017. (Photo: Robbin Whachell / HSWS)

A father and son set to release coho smolts into Hoy Creek during Salmon Leave Home on May 7th, 2017. (Photo: Robbin Whachell / HSWS)

The weather was perfect for the family fun free community event, and there was a steady flow of people throughout the day.  Patrons learned about the life-cycle of the salmon, viewed hatchery facilities, and had fun building bird boxes, getting face-painted, and doing fish-crafts.  Music was provided by 98.7 The Point radio. Watershed Watch Salmon Society was also on had with crafts for the kids and education for all. Jay Peachy honoured the Kwikwetlem First Nation traditional territory and delivered the "Salmon Song" accompanied by drumming.

The highlight of the day was the release of the smolts, as children of all ages delighted in carrying young salmon in buckets from the rearing pond a short distance to release them into Hoy Creek.

Face-painting, building bird boxes, and fish crafts...

Face-painting, building bird boxes, and fish crafts...

The society wishes to thank all of our hard working volunteers from Pinetree Secondary.

Over the summer things generally slow down at the hatchery, but volunteers still continue to oversee the care of some 25,000 coho fry, approximately 5 months old, who will be transferred into the rearing pond before June.

The bird box building station at Salmon Leave Home. 

The bird box building station at Salmon Leave Home. 

See ALL of our photos from Salmon Leave Home on our Facebook album HERE.

Work also continues in the riparian areas of the watershed to ensure invasive species are reduced and native plants are thriving. A healthy riparian area ensures a healthy creek.

In July or August the society also does a stream cleanup, removing trash and debris from Scott and Hoy Creeks. To get involved, click our "Get Involved" button, or email the Society at hoyscottwatershed@gmail.com

 

 

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society members release chum salmon fry

HSWS members met at dusk to release the chum salmon fry. Rodney Lee, hatchery manager (seen center) provides direction.

HSWS members met at dusk to release the chum salmon fry. Rodney Lee, hatchery manager (seen center) provides direction.

On March 19th, members of Hoy-Scott Watershed Society met near dusk at the Hoy Creek Hatchery to release 26,363 chum salmon fry.  This was an historic moment as the society has not raised chum salmon since the mid-90s. Fry were netted into buckets in the Capilano trough room, and hand carried to be released into Hoy Creek.  The process was led by hatchery manager, Rodney Lee.

"The 2016 brood stock season was super busy with our hatchery introducing a program to rear Chum salmon in addition to the Coho salmon that we've traditionally raised," said hatchery manager Rodney Lee. "The really warm October had creek temperatures in the 13C range which made for quick incubation early in the season, but then we had the really cold temperatures (creek temp lows under 3C) throughout much of the winter which really slowed development."

"We have approximately 12,000 Coho fry and the last alevins are beginning to 'swim up'.  We will be shutting down and cleaning out our incubators for the season."

"Our Coho fingerlings from the 2015 brood stock season have really started their Spring growth.  With water temperatures rising, their metabolism increases, and they eat at lot more and grow rapidly.  We are focusing on getting them to target release weight in anticipation of our Salmon Leave Home event on May 7th."

Photos were taken by society members: Nathen Blower, Lilian Elliott and Arno Hazebroek

See all our photos in our Facebook album HERE.

Albino chum discovered at Hoy Creek Hatchery

An albino chum salmon fry seen next to normal chum fry

An albino chum salmon fry seen next to normal chum fry

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society's hatchery manager, Rodney Lee discovered a rare albino chum salmon fry this past week while assessing fish in the incubation room at Hoy Creek hatchery in Coquitlam.

Last year we found a conjoined twin coho fry

Hatchery Manager Internship / Assistant Hatchery Manager Position Available

Hoy Creek Hatchery is located east of Douglas College David Lam campus in Coquitlam, along Hoy Trail.

Hoy Creek Hatchery is located east of Douglas College David Lam campus in Coquitlam, along Hoy Trail.

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society in Coquitlam, B.C. has an internship opening for a fish hatchery manager.

The individual will work with current hatchery manager, Rodney Lee as an assistant in managing the hatchery. No previous experience is needed.  This role will act as the manager's backup, and will train in all aspects of managing the hatchery including brood stock collection, egg takes, equipment operation and maintenance, egg incubation and caring for the alevins and fry. 

Interested persons should provide a brief essay stating your interest, previous experience (if any) and why you'd like this role. 

Time commitment: Late September to end June.  Hours vary but would typically require at least 3 hours every Saturday morning through the season.  This commitment will coincide with our season where we capture broodstock all the way through until the fry are marked (adipose clipped) and can be transferred across to the rearing pond.  The commitment ends with season ending equipment cleaning.

Communication: Needs to be available by cell phone and text message as a primary means of communication.  Email is secondary.

What will the intern do?:
- Learn how the hatchery operates
- Learn how to start-up and maintain equipment
- Learn about salmon and primarily the 2 species we will be incubating - Chum and Coho
- Learn about and conduct the egg take and fertilization process.
- Learn about and maintain biosecurity protocol for the facility.
- Assist with weekly and season maintenance activities
- Assist with the care and feeding of all generations of fish
- Assist with fish length and weight sampling including started fish health calculations
- Assist with taking water quality measurements
- Assist with operation of the rearing pond including the operation of the lower pond and outlet weir.
- Learn about aquaculture in the context of the Salmon Enhancement Program through Fisheries and Oceans Canada.
- Assist with planning and execution of fish marking (adipose clipping).
- Assist with transport and release of surplus Coho fry to Upper Hoy and Upper Scott if necessary.
- Help with riparian restoration by removing invasive plants (maintain sites that have been recently restored) - optional.
- Assist at our public events: Salmon Come Home (October); Salmon Leave Home (May)
- Act as the backup for Rodney in terms of managing the hatchery once trained.

Please email Rodney Lee with questions or to state your interest in this role: rodneyclee@gmail.com


Hoy-Scott Watershed Society (HSWS) is a volunteer run non-profit society that operates a small salmon hatchery beside Hoy Creek, and conducts a salmon enhancement program in partnership with the City of Coquitlam, and with technical expertise from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The group stewards the Hoy and Scott Watersheds, promoting public awareness and education, and is involved in watershed habitat restoration and preservation.  Learn more at our website: hoyscottcreeks.org

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society Conducts Successful Monthly Open Houses

HSWS-Rodney-Lee-Open-House

[UPDATED: NEW TIMES as of Oct. 2017 is 10 to 11:30 a.m.]

While our volunteers are always open to visits and questions from the public when working at the hatchery or in the riparian area, this year we conducted monthly open houses on the first Saturday of each month. This allows potential volunteers, and the public, a time to learn more about our work, and tour our facility. 

Open houses will not run during the summer (July, August), but will return on Saturday, September 3rd, from 12 noon to 1:30 pm.

You can reach us at hoyscottwatershed@gmail.com to request a tour. Please note that tours are dependent on volunteer availability.

Hoy-Scott Watershed Society releases surplus salmon fry

A Hoy-Scott Watershed Society volunteer releases surplus coho fry into upper Scott Creek (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

A Hoy-Scott Watershed Society volunteer releases surplus coho fry into upper Scott Creek (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

In May 2016, we had approximately 19,000 coho fry at Hoy Creek Hatchery.  Hoy-Scott Watershed Society's annual aquaculture license with federal fisheries allows us to incubate up to 25,000 eggs but only release 5,000 1-year-old Coho smolts from that brood year in May.  

Any excess are released to the Upper Hoy and Scott Creeks to areas of the stream where wild fry are not present. In addition, fry are released to Pinnacle Pond. From those locations, the Coho fry can make use of the habitat, grow and eventually make their way out to the ocean to complete their lifecycle.

On May 23rd, HSWS volunteers (Rodney, Chris F, Alex, Dulce & Ed) weighed and counted out our surplus and loaded up the truck for transport and released them at 5 different locations.  The fry weighed approximately 1.3 grams and were about 5 months old.

Hatchery manager, Rodney Lee looks over his son releasing surplus salmon into the creek on May 23rd in Coquitlam.  (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

Hatchery manager, Rodney Lee looks over his son releasing surplus salmon into the creek on May 23rd in Coquitlam.  (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

While at these release sites, we observed some larger trout with the smallest being 4-5" and the largest 6-7" but no small fry were present. We also saw a black bear.

The locations we released the surplus coho fry to on Monday, May 23rd were:

Upper Hoy - Camelback Ct off of Plateau; Upper Scott - Panorama by Bramblewood; Upper Hoy - by Plateau Village at Johnson and Plateau; Upper Scott - Hydro pond at the top of Eagle Mountain Drive; and Pinnacle Pond.

Dulce releases surplus salmon into Scott Creek(Photo: Ed Paulino)

Dulce releases surplus salmon into Scott Creek(Photo: Ed Paulino)

Once our remaining fry grow to 2 -3 grams they will be ready for marking, and will have their adipose fins clipped to identify them as hatchery fish. Our hatchery fry continue to be hand fed twice per day.

See MORE PHOTOS from the release on our Facebook album.

This healthy looking black bear was spotted by our team beside Pinnacle Pond, Coquitlam (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

This healthy looking black bear was spotted by our team beside Pinnacle Pond, Coquitlam (Photo: Ed Paulino / HSWS)

Local artist adds colour and education to Hoy Creek Hatchery

A lifecycle mural on the wall of our Capilano trough room. Artwork by Patricia Gaspar

A lifecycle mural on the wall of our Capilano trough room. Artwork by Patricia Gaspar

Local artist, Patricia Gaspar,  has been most generous with her talents as it relates to the Hoy-Scott Watershed Society.  

Our salmon hatchery facility in Coquitlam boasts several pieces and installations created by Ms. Gaspar in a variety of mediums, most of which are permanent fixtures, all enjoyed by the community still to this day.

A painting by Patricia Gaspar of the Hoy Creek Hatchery adorns our office wall.

A painting by Patricia Gaspar of the Hoy Creek Hatchery adorns our office wall.

Herartwork was created between 2009 and 2013 and includes:

  • A pastel of the hatchery building, which is a prominent landmark along Hoy Trail Linear Park
  • A large paper mache coho salmon which hangs above our capilano trough which houses baby salmon during the winter/spring
  • The walls and bench in our capilano trough room also feature her artwork depicting the salmon throughout its life cycle in a mural format
  • And most prominent are the metal salmon pieces that adorn the open-air area above the rearing pond, where our young salmon live from summer through to spring.

The Hoy-Scott Watershed Society executive would highly recommend Patricia Gaspar for any art projects, in particular those that benefit the community.  Visit the artist's website HERE.

A huge paper mache coho salmon by Patricia Gaspar hangs in our Capilano trough room

High above the rearing pond by Hoy Creek is two prominent metal art fixtures by Patricia Gaspar.

High above the rearing pond by Hoy Creek is two prominent metal art fixtures by Patricia Gaspar.

Artist Patricia Gaspar works on a bench at Hoy Creek Hatchery

Artist Patricia Gaspar works on a bench at Hoy Creek Hatchery